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In the end, I suppose the greatest thing I can say about this novel is that it left me wondering what happened to Huck Finn. Would his intellect and compassion escape from his circumstances or would he become yet another bigoted, abusive father squiring another brood of dirty, doomed children around a fluorescently-lit Wal-Mart? View all 65 comments. Jun 13, Petra Eggs rated it it was amazing Shelves: This is a rant.

Some very pc "authors" and "editors" took it upon themselves to change the N word to 'robot'. They then rewrote the book to take away any mention of humans and to 'roboticise' words such as 'eye' which becomes something like 'optical device'. The illustrations have also been changed. I have no problem with this, but I do have two major issues with this edition. The first problem is with This is a rant. The first problem is with the librarians who think think this is close enough to the original that it should be combined and therefore share the ratings of Mark Twain's original book.

There was a long discussion in the librarian thread where some librarians thought it was essentially the same book, perhaps most. So it was combined and the edition of the book I read was changed to that one. This robot edition was a Kindle book. Think about it and the danger of these 'authors'.


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If this is acceptable and it is to a lot of the librarians, why not politically correct Shakespeare, Oscar Wilde, Agatha Christie oh she's been done already. Sooner or later print books will be in used bookshops, research libraries and old people's houses. They will become not books to be read but collector's items. For reading it will be the ebook where changes can be easily and instantaneously made.

And if politically-correcting everything becomes Amazon policy then the whole publishing world will follow and your children will never know the original story that Mark Twain wrote. They will never understand how N word people were treated and that is my second issue with this pc book. They will never know that Jim, a grown man would not normally be expected to hang out with 13 year old boys, kowtowed to Tom and Huckleberry not just because they all liked each other, but because he was not free, he was a slave, property, and was subject to the usual treatment of property.

He could be ordered to do anything no matter how stupid or harmful, he could be sold or mistreated not even for punishment but just because he had no human rights whatsoever. Changing N people to robots negates all this. Yes it is more politically acceptable to Whites but how would a Black person feel having their history taken away from them?

The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn (Vintage Classics)

This is not pc as much as sanitising history and is wrong on every level. And it was done by the authors to make it easier for White teachers to teach this important book is it important if it is about robots though? Do you find this acceptable? A lot of GR librarians don't see a damn thing wrong with it. See Fahrenheit edited 27 Jan View all 45 comments.

Nov 11, Nathan Eilers rated it it was amazing Recommends it for: Hemingway said American fiction begins and ends with Huck Finn , and he's right. Twain's most famous novel is a tour de force. He delves into issues such as racism, friendship, war, religion, and freedom with an uncanny combination of lightheartedness and gravitas.

There are several moments in the book that are hilarious, but when I finished the book, I knew I had read something profound. This is a book that everyone should read. View all 6 comments. Aug 07, Matt rated it it was amazing Recommends it for: So I kneeled down. But the words wouldn't come. It warn't no use to try and hide it from Him.

Nor from me, neither. I knowed very well why they wouldn't come. It was because my heart wasn't right; it was because I warn't square; it was because I was playing double. I was letting on to give up sin, but away inside of me I was holding on to the biggest one of all. I wa "I about made up my mind to pray; and see if I couldn't try to quit being the kind of boy I was, and be better.

I was trying to make my mouth say I would do the right thing and the clean thing, and go and write to [Jim's: You can't pray a lie -- I found that out It was a close place. I took it up, and held it in my hand. I was a trembling, because I'd got to decide, forever, betwixt two things, and I knowed it. I studied a minute, sort of holding my breath, and then says to myself: View all 15 comments. May 25, Evgeny rated it it was amazing Shelves: Review updated on Ask any person anywhere in the world to give an example of a classic book of US literature and it is a safe bet this one will come out among the top three.

The only reason I am going to mention the plot for such famous book is the fact that I always do it; I am not breaking my own tradition in this case. So an orphan boy and a runaway slave travel together in Southern US. One of the most interesting parts of the book for me was gradual change in Huck's attitude towar Review updated on One of the most interesting parts of the book for me was gradual change in Huck's attitude towards Jim: There is an obvious anti-racist message in the book.

It also happens to have very funny laugh-out-loud moments. It also contains satirical depiction of some aspects of life in small US cities in the early nineteenth century. It contains some very poetic descriptions at times. It also has some sad moments. It is a classic book which is also still fun to read unlike numerous classics I can think of. This is a book which teaches important lessons while still remembering that reading can be fun.

The book is written in the first person vernacular. This is really the only example I can think of where it works. It took a genius of Mark Twain to pull it off successfully. If an inspiring author who thinks about using first or third person vernacular stumbles upon my review my advice would be - do not, unless you think your writing talent is on the same level as that of Samuel Langhorne Clemens. The author wrote the novel in such a way that it became controversial countless number of times resulting in its banning it from public libraries and censorship.

One would think people would get over these controversies by now, but to nobody's surprise some people still find things in the book to be offended at, just take a look at the latest example: I will try to explain to the easily offended hypocrites why they are wrong in the least brain taxing way possible using simple ASCII art: This gives me an excellent opportunity to talk about limited copyright terms it seems to me we are heading for unlimited extension of copyright. Limited copyright term means that regardless of current political climate and resulting censorship we will always have access to a legal unaltered copy of the book as in this case: A lot of people do not appreciate the book because they were forced to read it in high school.

If this was your only reading by all means give it another try to get a fresh prospective. In conclusion this novel belongs to a relatively rare category of classics consisting of books that do not feel like you do heavy manual labor while you read them. My rating is 4. The original illustrations are excellent. Project Gutenberg has a copy with original illustrations. View all 33 comments. View all 17 comments. Jul 18, Nayra. View all 5 comments. It is a direct sequel t It is a direct sequel to The Adventures of Tom Sawyer. View all 3 comments. Nov 19, Madeline rated it really liked it Shelves: I mean, I understand why they didn't giving middle schoolers an excuse to throw around racial slurs in a classroom setting is just asking for a lawsuit from somebody's parents , but Huck Finn is better.

It's smarter, it's funnier, and Huck's adventures stay with you a lot longer than Tom's, because Huck's experiences were richer and more interesting, whereas The Advent I had to read The Adventures of Tom Sawyer in middle school, and I fervently wish that they had made us read Huck Finn instead.

It's smarter, it's funnier, and Huck's adventures stay with you a lot longer than Tom's, because Huck's experiences were richer and more interesting, whereas The Adventures of Tom Sawyer could easily have been titled The Adventures of an Entitled Little Asshole. If Tom had to go through half of what happens to Huck in this story, he'd be balled up in the corner crying after five minutes. The action of Huck Finn is set in motion when Huck's father shows up and decides that he's going to be responsible for his son now the story picks up right where Tom Sawyer left off, with Huck and Tom becoming rich, hence Finn Sr.

Huck's father essentially kidnaps him, taking him to a cabin in the middle of nowhere and getting drunk and beating his son. Huck escapes by faking his own death and it's awesome and begins traveling up the Mississippi river. He runs into Jim, a slave who belonged to the Widow Douglas's sister. Jim overheard his owner talking about selling him, so he decided to run away and try to go north. Huck, after some hesitation, goes with him. From this point, the structure of the book closely mirrors Don Quixote: On their travels, Huck and Jim encounter con men, criminals, slave traders, and in the best mini-story in the book a family involved in a Hatfields-and-McCoys-like feud with a neighboring clan.

The story comes full circle when Tom Sawyer shows up and joins Jim and Huck for the last of their adventures, and the best part of this is that Tom Sawyer's overall ridiculousness becomes obvious once we see him through Huck's eyes. Huck is a great narrator, and I think one of the reasons I liked this book more than its counterpart was because it's narrated in first person, and so Huck's voice is able to come through clearly in every word. In addition to the great stories, there are also some really beautiful descriptions of the Mississippi river, as seen in this passage about the sun rising on the river: A fun, deceptively light series of stories that's funny and sad when you least expect it.

Well done, The List - you picked a good one, for once. Oh, I get it. You want me to talk about the racism, right? You want me to discuss how Huck views Jim as stolen property instead of a person and criticize the frequent use of the N-Word and say "problematic" a lot, right?

I'm not getting involved in that, because it's stupid and pointless, and I'm just going to let Mark Twain's introduction to The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn speak for itself, and the work as a whole: View all 22 comments. I vaguely recall a primary school teacher abruptly halting a class read-aloud session, perhaps because of that. Was it the air of earnest solemnity that surrounds so-called classics? Savour that wonderful opening paragraph and tell me you can't hear Holden Caulfield in the cadences: That book was made by Mr. Mark Twain, and he told the truth, mainly.

There was things which he stretched, but mainly he told the truth. I never seen anybody but lied one time or another, without it was Aunt Polly, or the widow, or maybe Mary. Everything to come is in those opening lines, penned in that distinct, nearly illiterate yet crudely poetic voice. The outlines of the plot should be familiar: Huck, a scrappy, barely literate boy, flees his abusive, alcoholic father by faking his death and travelling the Mississippi and Ohio Rivers with Jim, an escaped slave, on a raft. Huck's gradual awakening to Jim's plight is subtle and touching, never sentimental.

In a sense the book chronicles his growing conscience. And the colourful characters he and Jim meet and the adventures they have add up to a fascinating, at times disturbing look at a conflicted, pre-Civil War nation. We meet a Hatfields vs. McCoys type situation; a group of rapscallions who put on a vaudeville-style act and try to fleece rubes; a scene of desperation and danger on a collapsed boat.

We witness greed, anger and most of the other deadly sins — all from a little raft on the Mississipi. And then comes a passage like this: When I got there it was all still and Sunday-like, and hot and sun-shiny; the hands was gone to the fields; and there was them kind of faint dronings of bugs and flies in the air that makes it seem so lonesome and like everybody's dead and gone; and if a breeze fans along and quivers the leaves it makes you feel mournful, because you feel like it's spirits whispering — spirits that's been dead ever so many years — and you always think they're talking about YOU.

You can see, hear and feel what he's describing. Hard to believe this was written more than years ago.


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In the book's closing pages, Huck tells us this: Well, gosh, Huck, it war worth all yer trouble. View all 36 comments. Mar 03, Fabian rated it really liked it. No wonder the Spanish think themselves superior with their Quixote, undoubtedly a blueprint for this mischievous Every Boy! Everyone in town thinks Huck dead, and what does he do but follow the tradition of a plot folding unto itself as Don Q finds his story become medi THE Greatest American Novel?

Everyone in town thinks Huck dead, and what does he do but follow the tradition of a plot folding unto itself as Don Q finds his story become medieval pop culture in Part II of that superior novel as he disguises himself as a little girl and tries to squeeze information out of some lady about his myth-in-the-making trek. It seems everyone cares for this vagrant, a perpetual Sancho to Tom Sawyer's Quixote, whose redeemable features include a pre-transcendental openmindedness and an inclination to live only in the NOW. But the narrator, a very unreliable one at that, surrounds himself with bad bad men, playing the role of accomplice often, always safe and sound under the dragon's wing.

The humor is obvious, but I have to admit that this picaresque novel about a boy who avoids "sivilization" at all costs is beaten mercilessly by a more modern, therefore more RELEVANT tale of the South, "Confederacy of Dunces. View all 10 comments. Nov 21, Manny rated it it was amazing Shelves: One of my absolute favourite books, which I have read multiple times.

If at all possible, get an edition with the original illustrations. In fact, I'm embarrassed to admit that I hadn't even heard of it until Jordan gave me a few pointers earlier today. So, no doubt all this has been sa One of my absolute favourite books, which I have read multiple times. So, no doubt all this has been said before, but I still can't resist the temptation to add my two centimes worth. In case you're as ignorant as I was about hot topics in the literary world, the furore concerns an edition of Huckleberry Finn in which the word 'nigger' has been systematically replaced with 'slave'.

My initial response was plain surprise. One of the aspects of the book I enjoy most is Twain's appallingly exact ear for dialogue.

The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn Part 1: Crash Course Literature #302

He's reproducing the language actually used in the American South of the s, and this, above all, is what gives the novel its force; so why on earth would anyone want to change it? For example, here's Huck's Paw in full flow: There was a free nigger there from Ohio -- a mulatter, most as white as a white man. He had the whitest shirt on you ever see, too, and the shiniest hat; and there ain't a man in that town that's got as fine clothes as what he had; and he had a gold watch and chain, and a silver-headed cane -- the awfulest old gray-headed nabob in the State.

And what do you think? They said he was a p'fessor in a college, and could talk all kinds of languages, and knowed everything. And that ain't the wust. They said he could vote when he was at home. Well, that let me out. Thinks I, what is the country a-coming to? It was 'lection day, and I was just about to go and vote myself if I warn't too drunk to get there; but when they told me there was a State in this country where they'd let that nigger vote, I drawed out.

I says I'll never vote agin. Them's the very words I said; they all heard me; and the country may rot for all me -- I'll never vote agin as long as I live. And to see the cool way of that nigger -- why, he wouldn't a give me the road if I hadn't shoved him out o' the way. I says to the people, why ain't this nigger put up at auction and sold? And what do you reckon they said?

Why, they said he couldn't be sold till he'd been in the State six months, and he hadn't been there that long yet. There, now -- that's a specimen. They call that a govment that can't sell a free nigger till he's been in the State six months. Here's a govment that calls itself a govment, and lets on to be a govment, and thinks it is a govment, and yet's got to set stock-still for six whole months before it can take a hold of a prowling, thieving, infernal, white-shirted free nigger.

I'm sorry, but I'm honestly unable to see how anyone could think the above passage was racist or might be improved by substituting 'slave' for 'nigger'. It's incidents like this which create the popular European myth that Americans don't understand the concept of irony.

If you're curious to know more about the tradition of improving great works of literature by removing dubious words, you might want to take a quick look at the Wikipedia article on Thomas Bowdler which Jordan and I were giggling over. Bowdler, it turns out, had acted from the best of motives. When he was young, his father had entertained him by reading aloud from Shakespeare; but Later, Bowdler realised his father had been extemporaneously omitting or altering passages he felt unsuitable for the ears of his wife and children. Bowdler felt it would be worthwhile to present an edition which might be used in a family whose father was not a sufficiently "circumspect and judicious reader" to accomplish this expurgation himself.

He undertook to create a suitably amended version. Or, to be exact, he got his sister to do it and then gave out the books under his own name. Again, his reasons were unimpeachable: I won't criticise Dr Bowdler or his equally well-meaning modern followers. I just think it's a shame Mark Twain never had the opportunity to write a story about them.

View all 21 comments. If you're into stuff like this, you can read the full review. View all 4 comments. Anni I've just checked it out - and I noticed we both gave it 4 stars. I didn't even write a review because it was one of those I read years before I was p I've just checked it out - and I noticed we both gave it 4 stars. I didn't even write a review because it was one of those I read years before I was posting on Goodreads, which is probably an unfair thing to do, as I was relying on my gradually fading memory.

I didn't even write a review because it was one of those I read years b Anni wrote: I didn't even write a review because it was one of those I read years before I was posting on Goodreads, which is probably an unfai This is one of them Anni. Lots of many retro-reviews to dig up from the pits of memory. The problem is recovering the disks: Pretty good, kinda silly - but I think that is what Twain was going for - 3.

Twain is the king of the Yarn. Huckleberry Finn is a collection of outlandish tales all with lies and trickery at their heart. At the time of its release I am sure it became a bible for scoundrels and mischevious teens. This book is controversial, and even frequently banned, because of its portrayal of black slaves and the use of the N-word. I venture into shaky ground here by offering my opinion as I am white, bu Pretty good, kinda silly - but I think that is what Twain was going for - 3.

I venture into shaky ground here by offering my opinion as I am white, but I don't think I will cause too much trouble. I can accept that at the time of writing the words and language were fairly normal so as a time period piece it is true. However, I can't say I have read a book that takes place in that time period that so flippantly tosses the n-word around. Regarding banning of this book - I can definitely tell why some parents might be concerned about their kids reading this book.

I think a lot of it depends on how it is being taught - I would hope the teacher would put an emphasis on explaining the language being used. View all 12 comments. I really quite enjoyed this well-written satire of slavery-era America. I reads a lot like a Dickens novel, very episodic and with a youthful protagonist. I'll put aside the fact that Huck Finn may be the most annoying character in all of literature and say that this is a great American classic for a reason.

It's captivating, it's funny, and it's never boring. While it may not have aged very well, it's still an important text that covers a time when America was in its adolescent stage. May 23, Aishu Rehman rated it liked it Shelves: Huck Finn, cruelly abused by his drunken father, joins up with Jim, a runaway slave, and heads down the Mississippi River on a raft. Along the way, they encounter a deadly feud, a pair of con artists, and other characters from the pre-Civil War South.

All the while, Huck's conscience and basic decency wrestle with his society-bred ideas about race and slavery and right and wrong. This book swarms with key issues of Twain's -today's- America -world-, all properly backed up by irresistible humour and irony. As I've said elsewhere before, T 3.

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As I've said elsewhere before, The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn is another of those books that, in my opinion, with their sole existence make the world a better place. Oct 13, Rebecca McNutt rated it it was amazing Shelves: I used to hate this book when I was younger, but I'm glad I gave it another chance because there's so much more to it than I initially realized, and it's such an unforgettable and funny novel. Ah, the pleasures of reading classics untethered from schools and syllabi!

Aug 07, James rated it really liked it Shelves: I've actually read this book twice: My interpretations have expanded with the second read, but it's still at the core, a very profound book worth reading at least once in a lifetime.

9780307475565 - The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain

Huck Finn and Tom Sawyer appear in a few of Twain's novels, but it is in this one where Huck truly becomes a character, especially through his relationship with Jim. It's the type of book to openly challenge the norms and ideals of the midth century, relationships between various races, treatment towards fellow humankind. Over years later, this book is still pertinent to society today. So much needs to evolve and change, and perhaps with literature, it will move a little more each day -- at least as one of the necessary driving forces.

At times, I tried to forget that the book was calling out differences between treatment of ethnicity and race in America at the time. I wanted to think about it also from the perspective of two human beings who needed each other for survival, growth, life experience and comfort. Being color-blind and able to connect with someone, even if you don't see them or no much about them, is an important lesson in life. And one so few of us have an opportunity to experience. One book can't change it. One book can't truly explain it. But knowing what was happening years ago versus what is happening now is important.

As is what people thought back then Jun 08, Pages. Jan 24, Pages. Apr 01, Pages. Nov 01, Pages. Long cherished by readers of all ages, The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn is both a hilarious account of an incorrigible truant and a powerful parable of innocence in conflict with the fallen adult world. The mighty Mississippi River of the antebellum South gives the novel both its colorful backdrop and its narrative shape, as the runaways Huck and Jim—a young rebel against civilization allied with an escaped slave—drift down its length on a flimsy raft.

Their journey, at times rollickingly funny but always deadly serious in its potential consequences, takes them ever deeper into the slave-holding South, and our appreciation of their shared humanity grows as we watch them travel physically farther from yet morally closer to the freedom they both passionately seek. Huck, in flight from his murderous father, and Jim, in flight from slavery, pilot their raft through treacherous waters, surviving a crash with a steamboat and betrayal by rogues. Lost for more than a century, the passages reinstated in this edition reveal a novel even more controversial than the version Twain published in , and provide an invaluable insight into his creative process.

The changes that Mark Twain made indicate that he frequently checked his impulse to write an even darker, more confrontational work than the book he finally published. This edition, then, not only presents the Huckleberry Finn that has delighted and provoked readers everywhere for more than a century, but also brings forward the original book behind the book.

A breakthrough of unparalleled impact, this comprehensive edition of an American classic is the final rebuttal in the tireless debate of "what Mark Twain really meant. Lost for more than a century, the passages reinstated in this edition reveal a novel even more controversial than the version Twain published in and provide an invaluable insight into his creative process.

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A breakthrough of unparalleled impact, this comprehensive edition of an American classic is the final rebuttal in the tireless debate of "what Twain really meant. Wearing clean clothes, going to school, and having a hot meal waiting for him when he gets home are becoming boring and tedious. However, when they fail to be the vicious ransom specialists they claim to be, Huck decides to forget about excitement and tries to give his civilised life another go. He attends school and minds his own business… for a while. On the island, he encounters thieves, a flood that provides a nice surprise, con men, violent shootouts, family feuds and much more.

After so much adventure, Huckleberry Finn ends up wishing he was back at home, tucked up in bed after a hot meal. But does this wish come true, or do his adventures continue? Huck, in flight from his murderous father, and Nigger Jim, in flight from slavery, pilot their raft thrillingly through treacherous waters, surviving a crash with a steamboat, betrayal by rogues, and the final threat from the bourgeoisie. Informing all this is the presence of the River, described in palpable detail by Mark Twain, the former steamboat pilot, who transforms it into a richly metaphoric entity.

As their journey unfolds, Huck and Jim encounter adventure, danger, and a deftly scribed cast of characters that are by turns both menacing and hilarious. As a young child, he moved with his family to Hannibal, Missouri, on the banks… More about Mark Twain. There was nothing before. There has been nothing as good since. Fiction Classics Literary Fiction Category: Fiction Classics Literary Fiction. About The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn Long cherished by readers of all ages, The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn is both a hilarious account of an incorrigible truant and a powerful parable of innocence in conflict with the fallen adult world.