Guide How We Think: Digital Media and Contemporary Technogenesis

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How We Think is anchored by the concept of technogenesis, the idea that humans and technics have coevolved. Philosophers and anthropologists have long considered tool use as a definitional capacity that makes humans who we are; yet, tool use also has the power to make us what we are. The idea that our technics might have physical effects has generated concern to the point of panic, most vocally by critics like Nicholas Carr and Mark Bauerlein, who have argued that digital media are making us dumber at the individual, social, and cultural levels.

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While Hayles does not deny that our use of digital technology is changing the way that we think and the way we read—the subject of chapter 3 , she challenges the claim that the physical, cognitive, social, and educational changes occasioned by contemporary technogenesis are necessarily for the worse.

But neither are these changes necessarily for the better. Likewise, the reading styles associated with different technical mediations If you would like to authenticate using a different subscribed institution that supports Shibboleth authentication or have your own login and password to Project MUSE, click 'Authenticate'. View freely available titles: Book titles OR Journal titles.


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  6. How We Think: Digital Media and Contemporary Technogenesis, Hayles.

Project MUSE promotes the creation and dissemination of essential humanities and social science resources through collaboration with libraries, publishers, and scholars worldwide. For instance I recognized that a close relative does not reason. So I am a third of the way through How we Think and really looking forward in finding out what comes next.

Kindle Edition Verified Purchase. Written with the educator in mind, How We Think - published just over a century ago by philosopher, psychologist and educator John Dewey - offers philosophical guidance for teachers with an analysis of rational thought, scientific inquiry, the processes of inductive and deductive reasoning, the teacher-student relationship, and other topics. Dewey analyzes the various forms of thought, from sloppy, unreflective daydreaming to philosophically minded, critical thinking.

He argues that the natural resources of the student should be taken account of, and school conditions must be adjusted to them. The inductive and deductive processes are intertwined and rooted in experience. The nature of scientific meaning or conceptions is analyzed.

Neither concrete nor abstract thought is superior: Scientific thinking attempts to rise above empirical thought by controlling our observations and seeking to master our environment, allowing the future to come under our grasp. The inductive and deductive processes exhibit a unity of contrasting processes. So far as we conduct each of these processes in the light of the other, we get valid discovery or verified critical thinking.

Instead of occupying different realms, activities like theoretic and practical thinking, art and science, logic and psychology, and others each provide fuel for or grow out of the other. The information given to the student should be connected with the student's own observations and experience. Thought should be trained to base general principles on observation and use; the function and use of general principles determines their form. Truly general principles tend to apply themselves.

How We Think: Digital Media and Contemporary Technogenesis - N. Katherine Hayles - Google Книги

This is another great classic available for free on the web for e-readers this review pertains to the free Kindle ebook version. Students of philosophy, psychology and educators have much to profit from this work. Digital era has come and is changing how we relate with universe and culture.

There are acid critics who bemoans superficiality in reading and learning, for instance, as there are enthusiasts who see a way to redeem humanity. This is the first book I've read that cuts to the heart of what I feel are the central issues we need to think about as teachers of students who are born digital. Not once does it lament the fact that students of this generation are not like we were; it simply accepts that our students, like the technology we all now employ, are constantly in a state of change like we were at 20 years old.

It then provides concepts derived from a wealth of research that are useful for both scholarly inquiry and pedagogical approaches. This is a book I will draw upon in both my dissertation and in designing my next course. I imagine and hope these ideas will be more commonplace in the next couple of decades, though I doubt there will be many who will articulate the problematics laid out here with such grace, patience, clarity, and skill.

If you teach and you want to understand your students and the digitized world they and you live in, read this book. I don't even know how I came upon this book There may be a lot of new stuff out there on education I doubt whether Every page is thought out and thought provoking as you might expect from a book entitled "how we think". Some may find this version quite helpful since there are side notes that are meant to interpret what he is trying to say, but I didn't personally find that helpful.

I was a little annoyed at not being able to find copyright information to use in a citation. That was a bit weird even if it was legal. In this book, Hayles revisits a lot of what she has written before. Her views on the attention span of millenials and beyond are astute, but there's not much by way of new material in this book. I am a fan of Hayles, so that's kind of hard for me to say. It's a fascinating exercise in craftsmanship, enacting practice as you write about it, and persuasive writing.

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But it didn't persuade me, so that's why it gets three stars. A pretty tediously boring book. Useful for Academics, Technocrats, and Educators. Not useful for partisans.

How We Think

Cool, I get it, technology and human use of it are interrelated and "co-evolve," but I'm uninterested in tracing the evolution of and new techniques used in the humanities. This really just seems to look at the nuances of how the humanities serve an epistemological function for power. Attempting to differentiate between eras, as if one is substantially different from another, seems to hark A pretty tediously boring book.

Attempting to differentiate between eras, as if one is substantially different from another, seems to hark back towards some idyllic stage in history rather than actually exposing power in order to destroy it. Jun 18, Maribeth rated it liked it. But the sections of this book that I actually understood were very interesting the bits about close reading vs.

How We Think: Digital Media and Contemporary Technogenesis

Dec 26, David Bell rated it really liked it. Kate Hayles is consistently careful and convincing in her arguments, passionate about what both traditional literary scholarship and new digital scholarship have to offer. Certainly among the most coherent and provocative perspectives on how new media is transforming our cognitive experience, inviting the reader to eschew nostalgia for the era of the book and and simultaneously to avoid over exuberant new media cheerleading--in favor of a more rational approach to new ways of reading and thinkin Kate Hayles is consistently careful and convincing in her arguments, passionate about what both traditional literary scholarship and new digital scholarship have to offer.

Certainly among the most coherent and provocative perspectives on how new media is transforming our cognitive experience, inviting the reader to eschew nostalgia for the era of the book and and simultaneously to avoid over exuberant new media cheerleading--in favor of a more rational approach to new ways of reading and thinking.

Mar 02, Joy rated it really liked it. I was completely with Hayles for the first half of the book. She's right that human beings are evolving with the change in technology, and technology evolves, in turn, as a result of it. Our brains operate differently, and we use different skills than the past. However, I'm not convinced about her argument about narratives and databases.

May 04, Steen Ledet rated it it was amazing Shelves: As always, Hayles writes a fascinating book and although I prefer, as usual, her theory syntheses, I admire her meticulous and historically founded analysis. Gat insight into another turn of the humanities. Feb 04, Sabina Hartnett rated it really liked it. Useful for situating the reader in the modern academic mindset. Does a great job of outlining the role of Digital Humanities. Jun 22, Katie added it. Thomas rated it liked it Apr 10, Bex rated it liked it May 26, John Connell rated it liked it Mar 27, Josh rated it really liked it Sep 19, Grandeurs rated it liked it Apr 14, Katie McCarty rated it it was amazing Sep 24, Miranda rated it really liked it Nov 28, Ned Randolph rated it really liked it Apr 21, Tully Barnett rated it really liked it Oct 27, Amy rated it it was ok Nov 16, Christopher Hellstrom rated it really liked it Sep 24,